How men prepare for cabin crew recruitment

Updated: Jun 14

A few months ago I published an article with advice on how to prepare for a flight attendant assessment day. The information was based off of my personal experience so I touched on every aspect that female applicants should consider. Afterwards, several men contacted me asking for some male specific advice. I therefore decided to reach out to a male former colleague of mine in the Middle East to put together advice specifically for men. If you’re looking to find out how men should prepare for a flight attendant assessment day, then this information is for you.


This article should be read together with my previous article 'prepare for a flight attendant assessment day' to benefit the most.


Besides the general advice applicable to both men and women (like arriving early for your cabin crew assessment day and socializing with the other candidates throughout the day) here is some specific information for men to help them land their dream job.


Suit-up

When applying for a cabin crew position in the Middle East, men need to wear a suit and tie. No jeans, polo’s or anything else casual. You don’t only have to wear a suit at the actual assessment day, you need to wear it for the professional photographs you submit in your initial applications so it is best to invest in a decent suit. Stick to a black or navy blue suit colour and make sure your pants and jacket colour matches. A plain white shirt will give you the clean look you need to shine on the day.

Wear a suit to your assessment day and for your professional photographs.

Socks

Apply this simple rule: the colour of your socks should be the same as your trousers.

So if your suit is black, wear black socks.

If your suit is navy blue, wear navy blue socks.


Shoes

Stick to black dress shoes to be safe. Make sure they’re clean and polished for both the photographs and your actual assessment day. Tie your laces neatly!


Nails

My assessment process spread out over a few days. Each day included a hands and nails examination so don’t overlook this detail. Flight attendants work in the hospitality industry and we work with food, so proper hygiene is essential. Clean your nails and make sure they’re short. Maybe even consider going for a basic manicure to prepare for your cabin crew assessment day. (Several of my male colleagues would get manicures done on layovers anyway so don’t be shy about this).


Watch

Did you know that it is a requirement for all flight attendants to wear watches while on duty? So make sure you wear one to your assessment day. Keep it simple and stick to a classic design. No bling, diamonds or loud colours! The size matters too- if it is too large it will stand out.


Hair

Groom your hair. Style and image is important to both male and female cabin crew so get into the routine of caring for your hair. A short haircut is best. No man buns, mo-hawks or long beards… Shave on the morning of your assessment day so you arrive looking your best.


CV

Work on your CV and include high quality photos. This is your first point of contact with the airline so you need to make a good impression. Getting rejected purely due to a bad CV is a mistake that could have been avoided. If you have any customer service experience, make sure you highlight it because these are skills that cabin crew need to use every day. This includes experience as a waiter or even working in a bar.


Below is the same advice for CV’s I provided in my article for women:


°Have your CV organised into well defined sections. If the recruiter is curious about your education for example, he/she should easily be able to find that section on your CV.


° Order experiences from most recent to oldest. This is not essential but it is good practice and creates consistency throughout the CV.


° Stick to a professional color scheme. Try use color only to highlight important aspects. For example, only one color should be used to draw attention to all the headings.


°Use easy to read bullet points. If an explanation is required, keep it as brief as possible.


°List all the languages your are fluent in. Flying internationally puts you in contact with passengers that speak a variety of languages. Being fluent in any language other than English is a huge bonus and will greatly improve your chances of being recruited.


Professional photographs

It might be tempting to save money by asking a friend to take your photographs, but the quality guaranteed by professional photographers is worth it! When you arrive at the venue for your assessment day you should look exactly the way you look in your photographs, so use the photo shoot as a dress rehearsal.

Research the photo requirements of your desired airline. Some airlines have the guidelines on their website so send it to the photographer in advance to ensure you are both ‘on the same page’ and happy with the results. If you’re going to spend this money, you might as well get it right the first time.


Summary

Preparing for a cabin crew assessment day is a lot of work. If you give yourself sufficient time to prepare in advance you will increase your chances of success by not overlooking any detail in a rush of last minute preparations. Hopefully now there will be more information to help men achieve their dream jobs too. If you were looking for advice specifically on how men should prepare for a flight attendant assessment day, I believe you should be more than prepared if you follow this guide.


If you're interested in reading about life as an internationally flying cabin crew, so you can know what to expect once you get the job, then you will find this interview interesting: Internationally flying cabin crew interview.


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Disclaimer!

The views presented in this article are solely the author's based on available information at the time of writing. The purpose of this blog is to inform readers, not to provide professional advice. Readers are advised to research further and consult relevant professionals, such as flight training schools. Readers are cautioned when acting on information provided and assume all risk from such actions.

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